Sunday, 19 February 2012

Chelsea Buns A Delicious Treat During These Hard Times - Recipe and Method

Hot Cross Buns For Good Friday

History

In many historically Christian countries, buns are traditionally eaten hot or toasted on Good Friday, with the cross standing as a symbol of the Crucifixion. They are believed by some to pre-date Christianity, although the first recorded use of the term "hot cross bun" was not until 1733.
It is believed that buns marked with a cross were eaten by Saxons in honour of the goddess Eostre (the cross is thought to have symbolised the four quarters of the moon); "Eostre" is probably the origin of the name "Easter". Others claim that the Greeks marked cakes with a cross, much earlier.
According to cookery writer Elizabeth David, Protestant English monarchs saw the buns as a dangerous hold-over of Catholic belief in England, being baked from the dough used in making the communion wafer. Protestant England attempted to ban the sale of the buns by bakers but they were too popular, and instead Elizabeth I passed a law permitting bakeries to sell them, but only at Easter and Christmas.
Superstitions
English folklore includes many superstitions surrounding hot cross buns. One of them says that buns baked and served on Good Friday will not spoil or become mouldy during the subsequent year. Another encourages keeping such a bun for medicinal purposes. A piece of it given to someone who is ill is said to help them recover.
Sharing a hot cross bun with another is supposed to ensure friendship throughout the coming year, particularly if "Half for you and half for me, Between us two shall goodwill be" is said at the time. Because of the cross on the buns, some say they should be kissed before being eaten. If taken on a sea voyage, hot cross buns are said to protect against shipwreck. If hung in the kitchen, they are said to protect against fires and ensure that all breads turn out perfectly. The hanging bun is replaced each year.
Ingrediants
1 Medium egg beaten and made up to 225 ml./8 fl. oz. with Tepid water
Strong White Bread Flour....................450 gm./ 1 lb.
Dried Milk powder................................30 ml. / 2 tbsp
Salt......................................................... 5 ml. / 1 tsp
Caster Sugar..........................................50 gm. / 2 oz.
Ground Cinnamon...................................5 ml. / 1 tsp
Ground Mixed Spice..........................2 1/2 ml. / 1/2 tsp
Easy Blend Dried Yeast.....................7 1/2 ml. / 1 1/2 tsp
Currants.................................................75 gm. / 3 oz.
Mixed Peel.............................................50 gm. / 2 oz.
Paste for Crosses
Melted Butter..........................................40 gm. / 1 1/2 oz.
Plain Flour...............................................40 gm, / 1 1/2 oz.
Water........................................................75 ml. / 3 fl. oz.
Beaten egg to Glaze
Sugar Glaze
Milk..........................................................60 ml. /  4 tbsp
Caster Sugar.............................................50 gm. / 2 oz.

Method
1) Remove Pan from breadmaker,
2) Place kneading blade onto the shaft in the bread pan making sure it is pressed down fully,
3) Place all ingredients in the pan in order they are listed above,
4) Insert the pan in the breadmaker,
5) Select Program - Dough,
6) Press on,
7) At the end of the Dough cycle, remove dough from the pan and place on a floured work surface,
8) Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces, knock back (knead) each piece, shape into rounds and place on a greased baking sheet, cover with oiled cling film and leave to rise in a warm place (airing cupboard) for 40-60 minutes, or until double in size, remove the cling film.
9) Cut crosses on the top of each bun with a sharp knife and glaze with beaten egg, alternatively if you wish to give the buns a traditional finish mixed to paste ingrediants together and pipe them onto the crosses using a fine nozzle.
10) Bake in a pre-heated oven at 225 degrees C / 425 degrees F / Gas mark 7  for 10 minutes or until golden brown.
11) Remove from oven and place on a wire tray to cool,
12) Heat the milk and sugar together with 4 x 15 ml. / 4 tbsp water. Bring to the boil and boil for 1-2 minutes, then brush over buns.
 
Yum Delish



Here 4 The Chelsea Buns
The Chelsea bun is a type of currant bun that was first created in the 18th century at the Bun House in Chelsea, an establishment favoured by Hanoverian royalty and demolished in 1839. The bun is made of a rich yeast dough flavoured with lemon peel, cinnamon or a sweet spice mixture. Prior to being rolled into a square spiral shape the dough is spread with a mixture of currants, brown sugar and butter. The process of making this bun is very similar to that involved in producing the cinnamon roll. After cooked traditionally the chelsea bun is glazed with cold water and sugar, it is glazed while still hot so the water evaporates and leaves a sticky sugar glaze, making the bun much sweeter.

Ingredients
1 Medium Egg, beaten and made up to 150 ml. / 5 fl.  oz. with Tepid water,
Strong White bread Flour........225 gms. / 8 oz.
Dried Milk Powder...................22-1/2 ml. / 1-1/2 tbsp.
Salt............................................2-1/2 ml. / 1/2 tsp.
Caster Sugar..............................25 gms. / 1 oz.
Butter.........................................25 gms. / 1 oz.
Easy Blend Dried Yeast.............5 ml. 1 tsp.
Filling
Melted Butter.............................25 gms. / 1 oz.
Light soft brown sugar...............50 gms. / 2 oz.
Mixed dried fruit........................100 gms. / 4 oz.
Glace cherries, chopped.............25 gms. / 1 oz.
Chopped nuts..............................25 gms. / 1 oz.
Glaze
Caster sugar.................................45 ml. / 3 tbsp.
Water............................................30 ml. / 2 tbsp.

Method

Method
1) Remove bread pan from breadmaker,
2) Place kneading blade onto shaft in the bread pan, making sure its puhed down fully,
3) Place all the ingredients in the pan in order they appear in the above list, i.e, water, flour, milk, salt, butter and yeast. (make a hollow in the flour and place yeast in it)
4) Insert the bread pan into the breadmaker locking it clock wise,
5) Select Program - Basic Dough
6) Press On.
7) At the End of the cycle (approx. 1 hr. 15 min.) remove bread pan with oven mitt,
8) Remove Dough from pan and place on a flour worktop,
9) KnockBack The Dough (Knead) and Roll Out to Form a rectangle 30 cm. x 23 cm. (12"x9") 
10) Brush the surface of the dough with melted butter,
11) Sprinkle the dried fruit, cherries and nuts evenly to cover the whole surface, and roll up swiss roll fashion, from the wider side,
12) Cut into 9 equal sized pieces and place close together on a greased baking tray,
13) Cover with a lightly oiled layer of cling film and leave in a warm place (airing cupboard heat is fine) to rise for 40-60 minutes,
14) Remove the cling film,
15) Bake in pre-heated oven for 15 minutes (220 degrees C / 425 degrees F/Gas mark 7)  but check on them in 12 minutes depending on your oven, 
16) Make glaze by heating the sugar and water together until the sugar has desolved and then brush over buns allow to cool slightly and Enjoy Yum, Yum!

                                        Here For The Chelsea Chelsea Buns

I Urge Anyone to Get a BreadMaker Magic !
Warning! Locate Your Pets Before Closing The Lid :0)